Tag: Stall

Aerobatics & Spin Recovery: “The Inverted Spin” 1943 US Navy Pilot Training Film

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The Inverted Spin – Intermediate Acrobatics Part VII. "Points out the difference between an accidental spin and an inverted spin; and demonstrates the procedure of executing an inverted spin."

US Navy flight training film MN-1325f.

Public domain film from the US Navy, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

(aerodynamics)

A spin is a special category of stall resulting in autorotation about the vertical axis and a shallow, rotating, downward path. Spins can be entered intentionally or unintentionally, from any flight attitude if the aircraft has sufficient yaw while at the stall point. In a normal spin, the wing on the inside of the turn is stalled while the outside wing remains flying; it is possible for both wings to be stalled but the angle of attack of each wing, and consequently its lift and drag, will be different. Either situation causes the aircraft to autorotate (yaw) toward the stalled wing due to its higher drag and loss of lift. Spins are characterized by high angle of attack, an airspeed below the stall on at least one wing and a shallow descent. Recovery may require a specific and counterintuitive set of actions in order to avoid a crash.

A spin differs from a spiral dive in which neither wing is stalled and which is characterized by a low angle of attack and high airspeed. A spiral dive is not a type of spin because neither wing is stalled. In a spiral dive, the aircraft will respond conventionally to the pilot's inputs to the flight controls and recovery from a spiral dive requires a different set of actions from those required to recover from a spin.

In the early years of flight, a spin was frequently referred to as a "tailspin"…

Entry and recovery

Some aircraft cannot be recovered from a spin using only their own flight control surfaces and must not be allowed to enter a spin under any circumstances…

Spin-entry procedures vary with the type and model of aircraft being flown but there are general procedures applicable to most aircraft. These include reducing power to idle and simultaneously raising the nose in order to induce an upright stall. Then, as the aircraft approaches stall, apply full rudder in the desired spin direction while holding full back-elevator pressure for an upright spin. Sometimes a roll input is applied in the direction opposite of the rudder (i.e., a cross-control).

If the aircraft manufacturer provides a specific procedure for spin recovery, that procedure must be used. Otherwise, to recover from an upright spin, the following generic procedure may be used: Power is first reduced to idle and the ailerons are neutralized. Then, full opposite rudder (that is, against the yaw) is added and held to counteract the spin rotation, and the elevator control is moved briskly forward to reduce the angle of attack below the critical angle. Depending on the and the type of spin, the elevator action could be a minimal input before rotation ceases, or in other cases the elevator control may have to be moved to its full forward position to effect recovery from the upright spin. Once the rotation has stopped, the rudder must be neutralized and the returned to level flight. This procedure is sometimes called PARE, for Power idle, Ailerons neutral, Rudder opposite the spin and held, and Elevator through neutral. The mnemonic "PARE" simply reinforces the tried-and-true NASA standard spin recovery actions—the very same actions first prescribed by NACA in 1936, verified by NASA during an intensive, decade-long spin test program overlapping the 1970s and '80s, and repeatedly recommended by the FAA and implemented by the majority of test pilots during certification spin-testing of light airplanes.

Inverted spinning and erect or upright spinning are dynamically very similar and require essentially the same recovery process but use opposite elevator control. In an upright spin, both roll and yaw are in the same direction but that an inverted spin is composed of opposing roll and yaw. It is crucial that the yaw be countered to effect recovery. The visual field in a typical spin (as opposed to a flat spin) is heavily dominated by the perception of roll over yaw, which can lead to an incorrect and dangerous conclusion that a given inverted spin is actually an erect spin in the reverse yaw direction (leading to a recovery attempt in which pro-spin rudder is mistakenly applied and then further exacerbated by holding the incorrect elevator input)…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOB1Gkg2h18

Ice Induced Stall Pilot Training

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This training aid is intended to help pilots understand the phenomenon of tailplane and wing stall while flying in icing conditions. The training also explains icing certification rules. And it recommends cockpit procedures to mitigate ice induced stall in order to maintain controlled flight during unexpected icing encounters.

Much has occurred since NASA's original 1998 ice contaminated tailplane stall video. This film updates that training. Specifically addressing the reality that for the past 30 years most icing accidents were caused by wing stall versus tail stall. The FAA wants to make pilots aware that vigilance is necessary to avoid the low-speed stall accidents that occur in icing, especially with the autopilot engaged.

The information in this training video supersedes, supplants, and replaces the instruction in all previous NASA tail stall icing training videos.

PPL flight training video Cessna 172 – Must See for Student Pilot

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Me doing my PPL Flight training.
Practicing slow flight, seep turns, stalls (with flaps and clean).
Take off from Van Nuys airport, than flight over the mounties towards Santa Monica, Practice over the shore, flight back and landing. Feel free to leave comments and ratings. The Plane is a Cessna 172

Become a private pilot – EP1 –

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Private Pilot Flight Training, Lesson #33: Checkride Prep Flight #4

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Thursday, February 26th, 2015 @ 08:30 EST

Working towards obtaining my private pilot license.
This is my thirty third training lesson flight, though I wouldn't consider this a flight lesson anymore.
I've completed all my training, except for another 0.8 IFR flying, and have moved into the checkride prep phase.
Today's flight was (1.6 Hobbs Hour Today, 47.2 Total Hours) with 424 Aviation Inc, in Miami, FL.
My certified flight instructor (CFI) is Joe Ferrera. The airplane used was a Cessna 172R, with tail number N994WW,
out of Miami Executive (formerly Kendall-Tamiami Executive) Airport (KTMB).

Today's flight:

Checkride Prep Flight #4

– Slow flight
– Power-off/on stall
– Steep turn
– IFR & VOR Navigation
– Unusual Attitude Recovery
– S-Turns
– Turn around a point

The GPS Track is still available, at Gps4Sport.com, for replay but will not be synchronized to the video.
The link is provide further below.

To view a 3D Replay of the GPS Ground Track, go to:

Time Marks:
————————————-

* Note: I've removed all the pre-flight checklists since that's always the same.

(Click on any of the times below to jump to that particular section of the video)

00:48 – KTMB Departure ATIS INformation Mike
01:53 – Taxiing to Spot 2
03:09 – TC Comm: Northwest departure VFR
03:48 – TG Comm: Runway 27R via A
04:06 – Taxiing to Runway 27R
05:32 – Engine run-up checklist
11:34 – TG Comm: Monitor Tower 134.6
15:56 – TT Comm: Runway 27R, Cleared for take-off
16:12 – Short-field take-off, Runway 27R
18:34 – TT Comm: Northwest, Clear of Bravo
19:19 – TT Comm: Frequency change
25:08 – Slow flight
30:05 – Power-off stall
34:17 – Power-off stall #2
36:49 – Power-on stall
40:03 – Power-on stall while turning
42:07 – Steep turn to the right
43:14 – Steep turn to the left
45:14 – Fly by instruments
46:20 – VOR navigation
54:40 – Unusual attitude recovery
1:02:40 – S-Turns
1:11:29 – Turn around a point
1:14:30 – Returning to KTMB
1:14:55 – KTMB Approach ATIS Information Oscar
1:17:22 – TT Comm: Inbound full stop
1:17:55 – TT Comm: Runway 27R, Right downwind
1:22:50 – TT Comm: Runway 27R, Cleared to land
1:24:58 – Crosswind landing, Runway 27R
1:26:13 – TT Comm: A1, Ground .7
1:27:42 – TG Comm: A to Spot 2

Private Pilot Flight Training, Lesson #13: Stage Check Flight

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Thursday, July 31st 2014 @ 07:50 EDT

Working towards obtaining my private pilot license.
This is my thirtenth training lesson (1.3 Hobbs Hour Today, 15.0 Total Hours) with 424 Aviation Inc, in Miami, FL.
My certified flight instructor (CFI) is Brian K. Garhammer. The airplane used was a Cessna 172R, with tail number N997WW, out of Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport (KTMB).

Today's lesson involved:

– Steep Turns
– Power-Off Stall
– Crosswind Landing

*** THIS IS THE RAW FOOTAGE. I have only edited out the pre-flight check. ***
I've left the video untouch so that it can be played in sync with the GPS Track replay that can be found at Gps4Sport.com.
The link is provide further below.

To view a 3D Replay of the GPS Ground Track synchronized to this video, go to:

Time Marks:
————————————-

* Note: I've removed all the pre-flight checklists since that's always the same.

(Click on any of the times below to jump to that particular section of the video)

00:36 – Departure ATIS Information
01:43 – Here's how you do a brake check
04:03 – ATIS is now Victor
05:01 – TG Comm – Taxi Request
07:32 – Engine Run-up Checklist
10:11 – Control Box Pattern Check Explained
12:43 – Wake Turbulence Question – Better with or without wind
17:32 – TT Comm – Hold short 27R
18:05 – TT Comm – Cleared for take-off
18:38 – Take-off Roll
32:41 – Show me a steep turn
36:47 – How to perform a clearing turn
37:37 – Show me another steep turn
39:48 – Instructor demonstrating steep turn
42:13 – Last attempt at steep turn
43:18 – Let's try a power-off stall
45:52 – Instructor demonstrating power-off stall
47:12 – Last attempt at power-off stall
48:58 – Approach ATIS Information
57:53 – TT Comm – Inbound Full Stop
59:09 – TT Comm – Traffic Advisory
1:01:38 – TT Comm – I'll call your base
1:03:26 – TT Comm – Traffic in sight
1:03:44 – TT Comm – Traffic Advisory
1:04:10 – TT Comm – Cleared to land
1:04:28 – POI: Florida's Turnpike
1:04:34 – POI: Miami-Dade College's Kendall Campus
1:04:57 – POI: Alper's Jewish Community Center
1:05:06 – POI: My house
1:05:17 – POI: Mayra & Troy and Kim & Erik's houses
1:06:16 – POI: Evidence of fire at Tamiami Pineland Park
1:07:19 – Full Stop Landing
1:07:57 – TT Comm – Contact Ground
1:09:23 – TG Comm – Hold Short
1:10:28 – TG Comm – Taxi to Spot 2

Private Pilot Flight Training, Lesson #30: Checkride Prep Flight #1

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Monday, February 2nd, 2015 @ 08:30 EST

Working towards obtaining my private pilot license.
This is my thirtieth training lesson flight, though I wouldn't consider this a flight lesson anymore.
I'm completed all my training, except for another 0.5 IFR flying, and have moved into the checkride prep phase.
Today's flight was (1.3 Hobbs Hour Today, 42.9 Total Hours) with 424 Aviation Inc, in Miami, FL.
My certified flight instructor (CFI) is Joe Ferrera. The airplane used was a Cessna 172R, with tail number N994WW,
out of Miami Executive (formerly Kendall-Tamiami Executive) Airport (KTMB).

Today's flight:

Checkride Prep Flight #1

– Slow Flight
– Power-off Stall
– Power-on Stall
– Steep Turn

The GPS Track is still available, at Gps4Sport.com, for replay but will not be synchronized to the video.
The link is provide further below.

To view a 3D Replay of the GPS Ground Track, go to:

Time Marks:
————————————-

* Note: I've removed all the pre-flight checklists since that's always the same.

(Click on any of the times below to jump to that particular section of the video)

00:25 – KTMB Departure ATIS Information Echo
03:16 – Verifying Nav 1 & Nav 2
04:32 – Taxiing to Spot 2
06:19 – TC Comm: Departure to East VFR
07:09 – TG Comm: Hold position for aircraft in tow
07:33 – Engine run-up checklist
09:11 – TG Comm: Runway 9L via A
10:10 – Taxiing to Runway 9L
10:41 – TG Comm: Runway 27R via A
11:00 – TG Comm: We're IFR now
13:25 – KTMB Departure ATIS Information Gulf
15:23 – Reviewing Slow Flight Procedure
17:38 – Reviewing Power-off Stall Procedure
19:24 – Reviewing Power-on Stall Procedure
22:59 – TG Comm: What's current visibility?
24:24 – Reviewing Engine Failure Procedure
25:36 – TG Comm: Looks like 4-5 miles now
26:05 – TG Comm: Requesting Special VFR
32:50 – TT Comm: Cleared for take-off
33:20 – Take-off runway 27R
35:49 – Review of Special VFR Requirements
40:30 – POI: House in Hammock
41:13 – Practicing Slow Flight
45:52 – Practicing Power-off Stall
46:52 – Practicing Power-off Stall #2
49:27 – Practicing Power-on Stall
52:16 – Practicing Power-on Stall #2
53:51 – Practicing Power-on Stall #3
57:00 – Practicing Steep Turn
1:00:15 – TT Comm: Enter downwind, Runway 27R
1:01:04 – TT Comm: Ident
1:02:08 – Descent checklist
1:04:31 – TT Comm: Runway 27R, Cleared to land
1:09:16 – TT Comm: Contact Ground
1:10:00 – TG Comm: A1 to Spot 2
1:10:14 – Taxiing to Spot 2

Private Pilot Flying an Airliner – Take off & Stall – 737-200 full motion Level D sim

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Flying an Airliner is intense, but not as scary as I expected!
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Link to Part 2 "Approach and Landing + Brock's Crash":

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Delta flight Museum and 737-200 sim details:

Maximum occupancy is the sim operator and 4 others strapped in to the sim (when the motion is activated).
Divide the cost of the sim time by 4 guests, and it is a very reasonable, shared adventure.
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For more information about simulator training, contact Jason or Chris at Angle of Attack:

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FLIGHT CHOPS DISCLAIMER:
I am a "weekend warrior" private pilot, I fly for fun with no intentions of going commercial. I have had my PPL for over 15 years, but still consider each flight a learning experience – I generally take detailed notes after each flight to remind myself what went well or what I could do to improve…. Having the GoPro cameras to record flights like this is invaluable. I find these self analysis videos very helpful in my constant quest to improve, and am happy to share. Feedback is invited; however, please keep it positive.

Private Pilot Flight Training, Lesson #5: Forward Slip, Turn Around a Point, Touch & Go

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Thursday, June 5th, 2014 @ 08:15 EDT

Working towards obtaining my private pilot license.
This is my fifth flight training lesson (1.4 Hobbs Hour Today, 6.4 Total Hours) with 424 Aviation Inc, in Miami, FL.
My certified flight instructor (CFI) is Joe Ferrera. The airplane used was a Cessna 172R, with tail number N997WW, out of Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport (KTMB).

Today's lesson involved:

– Power-off Stall
– Power-on Stall
– Forward Slip
– Turn Around a Point
– Touch & Go Landing
– Traffic Pattern
– Normal Landing

To view a 3D GPS Ground Track synchronized to the video, go to:

Time Marks:
————————————-

* Note: I've removed all the pre-flight checklists since that's always the same.

(Click on any of the times below to jump to that particular section of the video)

00:28 – Departure ATIS Hotel
01:13 – Departure ATIS Gulf
02:01 – Taxiing to Spot 2
03:28 – Contacting Tamiami Ground for Departure
04:18 – TG Comm
08:06 – Taxiing to Runway 9L
10:01 – Before Takeoff Run-up Checklist
13:19 – Before Takeoff Checklist
15:07 – Before Takeoff Final Items Checklist
05:17 – Contacting Tamiami Tower for Departure
18:13 – TT Comm
18:38 – TT Comm Attempt #2
27:41 – Takeoff Roll
31:06 – Slow Flight
34:11 – Power-Off Stall
37:16 – Power-On Stall #1
38:47 – Power-On Stall #2
41:41 – Forward Slip #1
44:34 – Forward Slip #2
46:59 – Turn Around a Point #1
48:30 – Turn Around a Point #2
50:14 – Turn Around a Point #3
51:36 – Return to Airport
54:56 – Approach ATIS (hasn't changed)
55:06 – Contacting Tamiami Tower – Touch & Go Landing
55:34 – TT Comm
55:52 – TT Comm
57:21 – TT Comm
1:00:23 – TT Comm
1:02:21 – Straight-In Approach for Touch & Go
1:03:09 – Touch Down for Touch & Go
1:03:21 – Climbing Back into Traffic Pattern
1:04:23 – Traffic Pattern Upwind
1:05:24 – Traffic Pattern Crosswind
1:05:34 – Traffic Pattern Downwind
1:06:06 – TT Comm – Requesting Full Stop
1:07:02 – TT Comm – Cleared to Land
1:07:51 – Traffic Pattern Base
1:08:52 – Traffic Pattern Final
1:09:13 – Touch Down
1:09:47 – TT Comm
1:10:38 – After Landing Checklist
1:11:12 – TG Comm
1:11:26 – Taxiing to Spot 2
1:15:13 – Shutdown Checklist

Private Pilot Flight Training, Lesson #4: Slow Flight, Power-off/on Stall, Normal Landing

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Saturday, May 24th, 2014 @ 10:15 EDT

Working towards obtaining my private pilot license.
This is my fourth flight training lesson (1.4 Hobbs Hour Today, 4.8 Total Hours) with 424 Aviation Inc, in Miami, FL.
My certified flight instructor (CFI) is Joe Ferrera. The airplane used was a Cessna 172R, with tail number N994WW, out of Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport (KTMB).

Today's lesson involved:

– Slow Flight
– Power-off Stall
– Power-on Stall
– Normal Landing

To view a 3D GPS Ground Track synchronized to the video, go to:

Time Marks:
———————–

* Note: I've removed all the pre-flight checklists since that's always the same.

(Click on any of the times below to jump to that particular section of the video)

00:23 – ATIS Information for Departure
03:04 – Taxiing to Spot 2
04:44 – Contacting Tamiami Ground for Departure
04:59 – TG Comm
05:41 – Taxiing to Runway 9L
09:31 – Before Take-off Runup Checklist
10:58 – Before Take-off Checklist
11:25 – Before Take-off Final Items Checklist
12:24 – Contacting Tamiami Tower for Departure
13:30 – Contacting Tamiami Tower – Attempt #2
17:59 – TT Comm – Cleared for Take-off
18:29 – Take-off Roll
24:17 – Right Turn to 300º (Northwest)
25:41 – Climb to 2500'
27:18 – Left Turn to 270º (West)
27:33 – Slow Flight #1
30:02 – Slow Flight #1 – Recovery
30:29 – Slow Flight #2
32:40 – Slow Flight #2 – Right Turn to 360º (North)
33:20 – Slow Flight #2 – Left Turn to 270º (West)
33:58 – Slow Flight #2 – Recovery
34:40 – Climb to 3500'
37:03 – Clearing Turn to 090º (East)
37:47 – Slow Flight into Power-off Stall #1
39:04 – Power-off Stall #1
40:29 – Power-off Stall Demonstration
42:52 – Power-off Stall #2
47:21 – Power-off Stall #3
50:54 – Power-off Stall #4
52:03 – Power-on Stall Demonstration
55:45 – Power-on Stall #1
57:01 – Power-on Stall #2
57:39 – Returning to Airport
58:56 – ATIS Information for Landing
1:03:09 – Contacting Tamiami Tower for Landing
1:03:19 – TT Comm
1:07:42 – TT Comm – Cleared to Land
1:09:36 – Touch Down – My First Landing
1:10:44 – After Landing Checklist
1:11:32 – Contacting Tamiami Ground for Parking
1:11:42 – TG Comm
1:12:09 – Taxiing to Spot 2
1:15:36 – Shutdown Checklist

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