Tag: Boeing Field

Traveling background– we ride on a B-29

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Traveling background-- we ride on a B-29
Looking out the nose of a B-29 over Seattle– Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren Typically we cover airplanes and also airline companies below at AirlineReporter, yet periodically a chance

in the non-airline [r] globes appears that we simply can not pass on.So when the Museum of Flight right here at our Seattle HQ revealed that Doc, among just 2 airworthy Boeing B-29 bombing planes, was intending to check out in mid-May, we leapt at the possibility to see her up close. Also much better, we reached take a brief flight around Seattle.The aircraft showed up previously today (May 17 ). Its Star Wars-esque nose, 4 engines, as well as extremely glossy body made it very easy to find imminent. The pilots alleviated the bird onto the path and also cabbed to the Museum of Flight ramp as a group of sightseers collected to watch.While the B-29 was

initially generated in Seattle, Doc is not an indigenous Pacific Northwesterner. It was just one of 1,644 B-29s developed at Boeing’s Wichita plant, in Kansas, as well as rolled off the line in March of 1945. It never ever saw battle, and also took place offer in radar calibration and also target-towing till it was deactivated in 1956.

Doc, a couple of airworthy Boeing B-29 bombing planes left worldwide, relaxes after a media trip at Boeing Field in Seattle on May 17, 2022 It proceeded its solution to the United States Air Force also after retired life, yet as opposed to pulling targets, it turned into one. The plane invested years taking in the desert sunlight, together with the periodic bomb or bullet, on an Air Force battle array near China Lake, California prior to being uncovered in 1987. Remediation really did not start for one more years, in 1998, complying with a significant quantity of documentation to tear the aircraft loose from the United States federal government. Eighteen years as well as over 450,000 volunteer hrs afterwards, the remediation was full, as well as Doc once more flew in 2016.

Its Seattle go to is the initial for Doc, as well as the very first B-29 check out to the location in practically 8 years.

Flight designer Don Obreiter watches on the engine evaluates After a fast refueling– the staff had actually flown in from Spokane, WA– a gaggle of media were welcomed to board. AirlineReporter obtained unbelievably fortunate and also was provided a seat in the forward area, right behind the pilot. Site visitors and also team alike climb up aboard by means of a ladder in the nose equipment wheel well, and also are transferred right into the facility of the cockpit.In solution,

this area would certainly’ve been fairly active with 5 individuals in advance. Naturally there’s both pilots as well as a trip designer, plus a navigator and also, with the very best seat in your home, the bombardier right in the nose.

Twin piston engines passing on Puget Sound– Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren Today naturally, 2 of those settings are no more needed. The navigator and also bombardier seats are currently open for guests, as well as an extra seat was included behind the pilot to fit another individual for an overall of 7 up front.Eight extra are seated in back, 2 scanners that aid the pilots in observing wheels as well as flap setups, as well as 6 travelers. Both areas are linked using a long, slim passage that extends over the bomb bay. When it remained in solution, teams might pass through both areas in trip, yet today travelers are not normally enabled to do so, primarily as a result of the threat of disturbance.

Climbing out after removing from Boeing Field in Seattle– Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren Accessibility hatches to the bomb bay, situated under the passage at either entry, look even more like submarine hatches than anything you ‘d normally see on an aircraft. Since the B-29 was amongst the initial manufacturing airplane to be pressurized when it initially flew in 1942, that’s. This offered its trip teams considerable benefits comfortably that World War II-era bombing planes merely really did not have.The trip designer used a comprehensive description as he brought the 4 large radial engines to life on the ramp. The holler is fairly something, also from inside the aircraft, as well as reaching enjoy the designer function his magic goes over.< img loading="careless" size =" 754"elevation=

“503 “src=”https://getyourpilotslicense.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/flying-history-we-ride-on-a-b-29-5.jpg”alt course= “wp-image-60494 careless”data-sizes= “(max-width: 754px)100vw, 754px “srcset= “https://getyourpilotslicense.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/flying-history-we-ride-on-a-b-29-5.jpg 754w, https://getyourpilotslicense.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/flying-history-we-ride-on-a-b-29-20.jpg 250w, https://getyourpilotslicense.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/flying-history-we-ride-on-a-b-29-21.jpg 768w, https://www.airlinereporter.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/2022_05_17-Doc-B29-4.jpg 1300w”> Meg Godlewski delights in the sight

from the bombardier seat not long after remove– Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren As we taxi out under the phone call indicator’Superfortress’ it is difficult to neglect that the plane’s powerplants have a little a poor track record, at the very least traditionally. The very early design Wright R-3350 Duplex-Cyclone engines had a negative practice of overheating on remove. , if the pilots could not obtain the aircraft air-borne quickly sufficient they can– as well as usually did– capture on fire.. If teams really did not land quickly sufficient the fire would certainly spread out from the engine to the wing and also, well, points really did not improve from there.The 2nd

B-29 model experienced that specific trouble on an apparently regular examination trip in 1943, having actually left Boeing Field off the exact same path we’re currently on. The team was incapable to return securely. The aircraft collapsed right into an area simply north of the path– not also numerous hundred backyards where we are currently– eliminating 10 aboard and also 21 on the ground. Later on developments in engine technology resolved those very early concerns, conserving later on staffs and also airplane from a comparable destiny.

Pilot Mark Novak makes some last checks prior to leaving Boeing Field– Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren Our launch, however, was the good news is somewhat uneventful, albeit thrilling. The amazing variety of home windows from flooring to ceiling makes enjoying the departure an aesthetic banquet. It’s really difficult to determine what to take a look at: the path, the trip designer, or either of the pilots. It’s all fascinating.The pilot led the plane to the left, threading in between Boeing Field and also Renton Municipal, prior to working out right into a travelling elevation of 1,500 feet and also a rate of 200mph. It’s a leisurely stroll in the park for the aircraft which, while in solution, can strike elevation simply reluctant of 32,000 as well as full throttle of over 350mph. This made it among the much faster bombing planes in the War, usually able to fly greater as well as faster than adversary fighters.Not long after establishing a track north along picturesque Lake Washington, the staff signals we

can rise as well as check out. The area is not specifically huge, as well as the 3 people reporters behind the pilots function to work with changing settings. A guest browses in the forward bubble throughout trip– Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren Just like liftoff, it’s difficult to make a decision where to look. The sight out

front never ever obtains monotonous, with the globe slackly going by listed below. A little home window by the navigator table has a bird’s-eye view of the wing and also the engines, as well as periodically the trip designer provides the opportunity to lean over him to see out his much bigger– as well as open– window.The staff provides us to sit in the mouth of the passage, the top of which is enhanced by a little bubble home window that pays for great sights of the plane and also the location around it. Given that Doc never ever saw fight, it really did not have the gatling gun turret that generally would’ve been right here. Very same chooses the turrets listed below and also in the aft area of the aircraft. The only turret that continues to be is the tail artilleryman, with a set a inert Browning gatling gun standing responsibility. Co-pilot Ken Newell cleans up oil off the engines after a media trip at Boeing Field in Seattle on May 17, 2022– Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren The inside is perfectly brought back as well as practically immaculately tidy. Naturally, it’s not precisely totally classic. The cabin has contemporary navigational tools, is ADS-B certified(you can track her on Flightradar24 as well as obtain alerts from JetTip), as well as the aft area has a set of television displays with forward-facing sights throughout trip for those in back.Same also with most of the components. At some time components break as well as require to be changed. The team describes that the Air Force assists frequently, enabling them to search via bone lawns for classic substitutes where feasible. When that stops working, Boeing as well as Spirit Aerosystems typically action in to assist, custom-building components and also supplying proficiency. The plane also has some 3D-printed components in non-critical locations, something that the teams that initially flew her back in the ’40s most likely never ever developed possible.Toward completion of the trip we were fortunate adequate to switch for a seat in the sought after bombardier setting for touchdown. There is nothing else seat like it in aeronautics, at the very least that we can assume of.The pilots oiled the path a couple of mins later on, as well as parked back where we started.We had the possibility to creep with the passage after car park, and also have a look at the aft area. Unlike several various other warbirds, Doc’s guest area is furnished with real seats. You can access the tail artilleryman placement in trip, as well as those

in back did, by creeping via the last 10 feet approximately. It’s limited, which’s without the tools as well as ammo that would certainly’ve been saved below throughout her solution years.Outside, the team cleaned her down as well as prepped her for a couple of times off prior to flying starts once again later on this week.Unfortunately for Pacific Northwest-based visitors, trips aboard Doc throughout its Seattle browse through are currently marketed out. They aren’t dismissing future trips being included if adequate need exists, however, so watch on their internet site or provide ’em a telephone call over the weekend break simply in case.If you definitely need to fly on it as well as can not make it function right here, you can comply with the aircraft to any one of its following quits on the trip. A complete timetable gets on their web site. Be advised, tickets are pricey.

The least costly seats, in the aft area of the aircraft, opt for$ 600. The forward area begins at$1,200

for both in the cabin as well as leaps to$1,500 for that wonderful, pleasant bombardier ride.That’s not awfully unexpected provided the aircraft burns$ 4-5,000 in oil and also gas alone per hr, according to the staff. It increases after including insurance coverage, upkeep, as well as various other prices, they said.If that isn’t precisely in your spending plan, ground excursions

will certainly be readily available Friday with the weekend break; contributions urged. Or merely pop by Boeing Field around 9am either weekend break day as well as enjoy it go out for yourself.You’ll rejoice you did. A Trekkie Reviews Alaska’s New Star Wars Livery

The learning continues – mountain flying in the DA-40

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On final for runway 14R at BFI in a Diamond DA-40 - this wasn't from our mountain-flying day, but it's too pretty of a photo to leave out of the article. Katie Bailey photo

On final for runway 14R at BFI in a Diamond DA-40 – this wasn’t from our mountain-flying day, but it’s too pretty of a photo to leave out of the article

This is a continuation of my multi-part series on learning to fly. You can read the whole Fly With Francis series here.

The lousy Pacific Northwest early spring weather notwithstanding, I’ve made good progress towards learning both the Garmin G1000 instrumentation and the Diamond DA-40 aircraft. We recently got a decent break in the weather that allowed a flight from Seattle across the Cascade Mountains to Ellensburg for some basic mountain flying training.

Cruising westbound at 6,500' over Snoqualmie Pass was an amazing experience. Katie Bailey photo

Cruising westbound at 6,500′ over Snoqualmie Pass was an amazing experience – Photo: Katie Bailey

I’ve got about 10 hours in the DA-40 now, all but one of them with Carl, my ever-patient CFI. I finally felt comfortable enough with the plane to take it out on my own last week, even though Carl had deemed me ready to do that about five flight hours previously. I just wanted a bit more time with the plane, as it’s quite a bit different than the Cessna 172, especially in that it’s a lot faster and a bit fussier when it comes to controls, and it’s got a constant-speed propeller (also sometimes referred to as a variable-pitch propeller) that needs tending to via a dedicated control lever.

If you’ve been following this series, you’ll have read a bit about route-finding through mountainous terrain in my December, 2020 story about my certification checkride. There are, pardon the pun, mountains of information and classes available concerning mountain flying. Here in western Washington state we’ve got a large mountain range to both the east (the Cascades) and the west (the Olympics), so it’s pretty much required reading if you want to fly beyond the Puget Sound area. Flying over and through the mountains also requires different training than is needed for landing in mountainous areas, so I’ll be tackling the landings next as my post-certification training continues.

The lakes at the summit of Snoqualmie Pass are quite distinctive and make great visual navigation checkpoints. Katie Bailey photo

The lakes at the summit of Snoqualmie Pass are quite distinctive and make great visual navigation checkpoints – Photo: Katie Bailey

Route-finding through mountainous terrain is definitely about avoiding the granite, but it’s also about doing your best to make sure you have options if something goes wrong in the air. If you need to land in a hurry, for whatever reason – be it mechanical issues or being surprised by unexpected bad weather – you want options. So, both the outbound and return routes followed Interstate 90 over Snoqualmie Pass, which offered lower terrain, and a four-lane highway as an option for emergency landings, as well as a couple of mountain airstrips along the way. We flew the outbound leg at a higher altitude, and the return at a lower one to gain experience with both options.

Here we're adjusting the autopilot to turn a a bit more to the left while passing over Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Katie Bailey photo

Here we’re adjusting the autopilot to turn a a bit more to the left while passing over Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state – Photo: Katie Bailey

On a clear day with relatively smooth air, it was a glorious flight eastbound over the mountains at 9,500′, taking less than an hour to cover the 93 miles from Seattle to Ellensburg (which, for comparison, takes more than two hours by car via I-90).

On the downwind leg for landing at Ellensburg, Wash. Katie Bailey photo

On the downwind leg for landing at Ellensburg, Wash. – Photo: Katie Bailey

We practiced using the autopilot as much as possible, but it does require constant monitoring and adjustments to avoid clouds, while watching for other aircraft traffic, etc. Also, the DA-40 requires manually switching the two wing fuel tanks every 30 minutes to keep the load balanced, so watching for those alerts on the G1000 becomes part of your instrument scan.

Touching down on runway 29 at KELN. Katie Bailey photo

Touching down on runway 29 at KELN – Photo: Katie Bailey

The outbound flight went by quickly. After stopping to stretch our legs a bit at Ellensburg, it was back in the plane to enter the new flight plan into the nav system and head back to Seattle, this time through the pass at 4,500′ to 6,500′ (south and westbound flights are at even altitudes plus 500′, north and eastbound at odd altitudes).

While at ELN, we all visited the small mailbox outside the FBO containing the stamp for our Fly Washington passports. It’s a fun (and free) program to encourage pilots to visit airports in the state and log their adventures. If you’re a pilot (or have a pilot friend) in or near Washington state, I definitely recommend checking it out.

On short final for runway 32R back at KBFI. Katie Bailey photo

On short final for runway 32R back at KBFI – Photo: Katie Bailey

We had planned to fly at or below the tops of the mountain peaks traversing Snoqualmie Pass, but there was a fair bit of mountain-wave turbulence at 4,500′, so we climbed to 6,500′ into clear air – the DA-40 feels like it gets tossed around a bit more than the C172s in rough air. Mountain-wave turbulence happens on the downwind side of terrain, such as we experienced flying westbound into headwinds passing over the peaks. Mountain-wave turbulence and rotor waves are but two of the more uncomfortable/dangerous types of turbulence encountered in mountainous regions. Rapidly-forming clouds are another, especially when the temperature and dewpoint are within 3˚C of one another, so very thorough weather awareness, both pre-flight and updating in flight, are essentials.

More to come about mountain flying and, hopefully soon, the start of instrument training.

EDITOR-AT-LARGE – SEATTLE, WA Francis Zera is a Seattle-based architectural, aerial, aviation, and commercial photographer, a freelance photojournalist, and a confirmed AvGeek.

http://www.zeraphoto.com

I’m a pilot! FAA Checkride Successfully Completed.

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Success! I finally earned my private pilot certificate!

Success! I finally earned my private pilot certificate!

This is a continuation of my multi-part series on learning to fly. You can read the whole Fly With Francis series here.

After a year and a half of concerted effort, I’ve finally completed my initial training and earned my private pilot certificate in early November. It’s a great feeling!

For those who’ve been following along on my adventures at Galvin Flying, it’s been a long process of successes and setbacks, many of which were weather related because I live in the Pacific Northwest, where the local joke says that it only rains once a year — it starts raining in late October and stops raining on July 5 (it always seems to rain on July 4).

In case you ever wondered what the track of a checkride looks like, here you go

In case you ever wondered what the track of a checkride looks like, here you go. Screen capture courtesy FlightRadar24

Anyway, I did several mock checkrides in the weeks leading up to the actual FAA one, and had to complete Galvin’s end-of-course checkride before that. The end-of-course checks are designed to be more difficult than the actual checkride to ensure that pilot candidates are as prepared as possible.

The FAA examiner, also known as a designated pilot examiner or DPE, selects from a long list of information and flight maneuvers for the actual checkride known as the Airman Certification Standards. The check airman who oversees the end-of-course checks runs through the entire list to be sure you’re ready.

Both checks consist of a lengthy ground session to review the rules, regulations, and related information found in the federal FAR/AIM manual, plus aviation decision making, route finding, and so on. Then a flight to be sure you can fly all the required maneuvers to standards. The evaluations also require a very thorough flight plan to a randomly-assigned airport.

My FAA checkride assignment was to do a detailed VFR flight plan for the 200+ miles from Boeing Field in Seattle to Felts Field in Spokane, a route which included mountain flying. You don’t actually fly the whole route on the checkride; the planning is done primarily to assess your route-finding, weather assessment, and planning skills, although you do fly the first couple of legs of your plan on the checkrides.

My assigned aircraft for the checkride was this fine C172SP

My assigned aircraft for the checkride was this fine C172SP

If successful in the classroom, then it’s off to the flightline, where you’re evaluated on everything from how well you perform the pre-flighting of the aircraft, to your decision as to whether it’s safe to fly that day. Once that’s done and you’ve received taxi clearance and completed the pre-takeoff run-up and checklists, it’s off to fly the first couple of legs of your assigned flight plan. That went well, so I was asked to divert to a randomly-selected local airport, in this case Paine Field (KPAE) in Everett, Wash., which is designed to test your ability to create a new flight plan while in the air, along with being able to pinpoint your current location on the paper chart.

A Seattle sectional chart, the paper flight logs, and the first page of the briefing I wrote up for my checkride

A Seattle sectional chart, the paper flight logs, and the first page of the briefing I wrote up for my checkride

Candidates are allowed to use any technology available for planning, so I roughed out the route in ForeFlight, which is a most excellent flight-planning tool for pilots. Examiners are notorious for “failing” any technology a pilot candidate is using, which means they’ll tell you, typically at a crucial moment during the flight, that whatever tech you were using just broke and disallow you from continuing to use it, which sends you scrambling for your paper charts and paper flight plan.

So, it’s safest to primarily use the paper charts and use the tech as the backup for the checkride, as you are also responsible for being able to competently use whatever equipment happens to be installed in your particular aircraft.

This was my proposed route from Seattle to Spokane for my checkride. Screenshot is from ForeFlight

This was my proposed route from Seattle to Spokane for my checkride. Screenshot is from ForeFlight

The DPE asked me to perform several maneuvers, including slow flight, power-off and power-on stalls, turns around a point, and steep turns. After that, I had to put on a hood that restricted my vision such that I couldn’t see out the windows and could only see the instruments, then I was asked to perform several accurate course and altitude changes using only the instruments while maintaining proper control of the aircraft.

We then returned to Boeing Field, where I had to perform several different types of landings and takeoffs – short field, soft field, and normal.

A checkride is not considered to be complete until the aircraft is properly parked on the ramp and the engine-shutdown checklist is complete. It was at that point the examiner turned to me and said, “congratulations – your checkride was successful and you’re now a pilot.”

So, I've already started getting checked out in the Diamond DA-40 with the G1000 glass cockpit; next step will be to begin instrument training

So, I’ve already started getting checked out in the Diamond DA-40 with the G1000 glass cockpit; next step will be to begin instrument training after the first of the year

Less than a week after that, I started training to fly the Diamond DA-40, a plane I’ve been admiring all through training. Weather and schedule conflicts had conspired such that I’ve still not gone flying on my own as a certificated pilot, but that’s gonna happen soon, not to worry, … once this rain lets up.

EDITOR-AT-LARGE – SEATTLE, WA Francis Zera is a Seattle-based architectural, aerial, aviation, and commercial photographer, a freelance photojournalist, and a confirmed AvGeek.

http://www.zeraphoto.com

Solo cross-country flights complete, end of course checkride approaching

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Returning to Boeing Field after my first solo cross-country flight to Port Angeles, Wash. That's the Seattle skyline in the foreground, Bellevue in the middle-right, and the Cascade Mountains in the distance

Returning to Boeing Field after my first solo cross-country flight to Port Angeles, Wash. That’s the Seattle skyline in the foreground, Bellevue in the middle-right, and the Cascade Mountains in the distance

This is a continuation of my multi-part series on learning to fly. You can read the whole Fly With Francis series here.

So, it’s been a while since I’ve written an update, but that doesn’t mean I’ve not been making progress.

Since the last installment, I’ve done my three cross-country solo flights – they’re a requirement for the PPL, and consist of several solo flights away from one’s home airport. Cross-country meaning, you know, crossing the countryside and not a transcontinental flight in a small plane, which would take a couple days at best.

Requirements for the cross-country flights are that the each one has to include one leg of at least 50 nautical miles and a full-stop landing. For the long cross-county, the flight has to be a minimum of 150nm and include one leg of at least 50nm and full-stop landings at three airports, including returning to the point of origin.

For my flights, the first one was from Boeing Field (BFI) up to Port Angeles on the Olympic Peninsula. It was a spectacular day – completely free of turbulence, hardly any other air traffic, and clear as the proverbial bell.

The second one was the following week, from BFI to Chehalis, Washington, a bit south of Olympia. It was far more normal, with usual amounts of air traffic and slightly bumpy/windy conditions.

My flight planner for the second half of the long cross-country flight

My flight planner for the second half of the long cross-country flight

The long cross-country went like this: BFI-BLI-PAE-BFI. I started at Boeing Field, flew up to Bellingham International, then stopped at Paine Field on the way back to Boeing Field. It also went really well, thanks to how diligently my CFI (aka instructor) had prepared my navigation skills.

This was taken just a bit northeast of Paine Field in Everett, Wash., on my third cross-country to Bellingham International Airport

This was taken just a bit northeast of Paine Field in Everett, Wash., on my third cross-country to Bellingham International Airport

While flying, especially at this stage of my training, I’m pretty busy flying and navigating and communicating, so photos are still few and far between, taken only when I’m absolutely certain I can spare a couple seconds to pick up the camera off the passenger seat and grab a couple quick photos.

Northbound from BFI, headed for BLI

Northbound from BFI, headed for BLI

So, what’s next now that those milestones have been completed? The next steps are to prepare for Galvin’s stage three checkride, which is essentially a mock FAA checkride. If I pass both the oral and flight portions of that one, I’ll ostensibly be prepared for the big FAA checkride, which, if passed, will finally earn me a private pilot certificate.

Preparation for those items is well underway, and includes dusting off all my textbooks and notes, and doing a bunch of flights with my CFI to practice all the necessary maneuvers until I’m able to consistently fly them to standard.

The instrument panel in flight

The instrument panel in flight

Speaking of standard, the weather in the Pacific Northwest has been performing to standard, too. It’s been trending cool and cloudy with low ceilings, so I’ve had to cancel several flights due to marginal weather conditions. Now that August is here, things should settle in for summer so I can keep the training chugging along as I approach my end-of-course checkride and, hopefully soon, my FAA checkride.

For instance, a few days ago I had to cancel my local solo fight today due to low ceilings. Of course, about 30 minutes after my scheduled start time, it all cleared out. So it goes with flying.

EDITOR-AT-LARGE – SEATTLE, WA Francis Zera is a Seattle-based architectural, aerial, aviation, and commercial photographer, a freelance photojournalist, and a confirmed AvGeek.

http://www.zeraphoto.com